Why is it good to just stand and stare sometimes?

 Rene Magritte’s “The False Mirror” William Henry Davies in his poem “Leisure” answers: Leisureby W.H. Davies WHAT is this life if, full of careWe have no time to stand and stare.No time to stand beneath the boughsAnd stare as long as sheep or cows. No time to see, when woods we pass,Where squirrels hide their nuts in grass,No time to see, in broad day light,Streams … Continue reading Why is it good to just stand and stare sometimes?

How must one tell the truth?

“The Pleasant truth” (1966) by rene MAGRITTE Emily Dickinson answers: Tell all the Truth but tell it slant— Success in Circuit lies Too bright for our infirm Delight The Truth’s superb surprise As Lightening to the Children eased With explanation kind The Truth must dazzle gradually Or every man be blind— Do you agree with Dickinson? And Wallace Stevens wrote: “In the long run the truth does … Continue reading How must one tell the truth?

What is true about love?

“Lovers” by Rene Magritte In Jonathan Ames’s Bored to Death (HBO), the character George, played brilliantly by Ted Danson (have you watched Cheers?), answers (but not indisputably): I am in your movie. You are in mine. Two different films, really. We don’t really know each other. We just make a guess at knowing each other, right? I think the same is true about love. –  … Continue reading What is true about love?

"a virgin with no legs to leave me, no arms to hold me, no head to talk to me"

1934 Magritte Le Viol 72×54 cm The following is Susan Gubar’s interpretation of Magritte’s painting (above) in her article “Representing Pornography: Feminism, Criticism, and Depictions of Female Violation” (1987). Do you have a different take on the image? Endowed with blind nipples replacing eyes, a belly button where her nose should be, and a vulva for a mouth, the female face is erased by the female torso … Continue reading "a virgin with no legs to leave me, no arms to hold me, no head to talk to me"

Did Emily Dickinson mean ‘need not’?

I know parallel semantic and syntactic structure is a key feature in Emily Dickinson’s poetry. But reading the poem below, I was just thinking that ‘need not’1 might make more sense than ‘cannot’ in the first stanza. What do you think?  The Gradation of Fire (1939), Rene Magritte CXXXIII. You cannot put a fire out;A thing that can igniteCan go, itself, without a fanUpon the slowest night.You … Continue reading Did Emily Dickinson mean ‘need not’?